Hong Kong cracks down on protests against national security laws

Hong Kong Security forces cracked down on protesters who opposed a new draconian national security law which threatens dissidents and Hong Kong independence activists. During the protests, police fired tear gas and pepper spray on thousands who had taken to the streets, despite the lockdown measures intended to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Over 180 people were arrested during protests on Sunday. Responses from state officials Tam Yiu-Chung, Hong Kong's sole delegate to China's National People's Congress Standing Committee, maintains that the bill will pass through into legislation...

Somaliland president calls for independence recognition

The president of Somaliland has called on the international community to recognise the independence of the region and warned that unless Somalia “accepts the reality of two independent nations,” his government will explore international legal avenues. Though Somaliland was a former British Protectorate, it came under control of Somalia, just five days after the region gained independence in 1960. However, on May 19, 1991, Somaliland seceded from Somalia and declared independence, and still awaits widespread international recognition. A 2001 referendum reaffirmed the country’s independence...

Myanmar submits compliance report to International Court of Justice on Rohingya genocide

Myanmar has complied with a deadline set by the International Court of Justice (ICJ) and submitted a report on steps the government has taken to prevent acts of genocide against the Rohingya people. A foreign ministry official confirmed to Anadolu Agency that the report was submitted on Saturday, adding that it was based on three directives issued by the president’s office in April. The directives, issued in response to the ICJ ordering Myanmar to protect the Rohingya population from genocide, called on officials not to destroy evidence of genocide, to prevent the committing of genocidal acts...

Rwandan genocide suspect dead – UN

The United Nations confirmed that the remains of a former Rwandan defence minister who was wanted over the country’s 1994 genocide, have been identified in a grave in Congo. Augustin Bizimana, who was indicted on 13 charges, including genocide, murder and rape, is believed to have died in the Republic of the Congo, in 2000. His remains were identified by DNA testing, according to United Nations war crimes prosecutor Serge Brammertz. “Bizimana was alleged to be responsible for the murders of former Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana and 10 Belgian United Nations peacekeepers, and for the...

Main financer of Rwanda genocide arrested

Félicien Kabuga, one of the main financiers of the Rwanda genocide, has been arrested in France under charges from the International Criminal Tribunal of genocide and crimes against humanity. The Rwanda genocide claimed the lives of 800,000 Tutsi’s and political opponents in 1994. The US was supportive of this arrest, offering $5 million reward for information leading to Kabuga’s arrest. Kabuga is accused of paying the militant’s who carried out massacres during this genocide. Kabuga also founded and funded Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines (RTLM), which actively encourage the...

14 killed during clashes in Yemen

Clashes between pro-government and separatist forces in the Zinjibar and Abyan province in Yemen, have led to the deaths of 14 including 10 pro-government soldiers. The conflict has been described by Al Jazeera as the first major confrontation since separatists declared self-rule on 26 April in southern Yemen. According to Al Jazeera, both sides exchanged missile and artillery shelling on these two fronts. Separatists have claimed that they captured 40 pro-government soldiers as well as their military equipment. Read more from Al Jazeera.

Yemen vows to continue to fight against separatists

Yemen’s government vows to continue their fight against the Southern Transitional Council (STC) as both sides clash on the outskirts of Zinjibar, the capital of Abyan. The clash led to the deaths of 2 government soldiers and 2 separatists; 13 government soldiers were also wounded, and 11 separatists were wounded. The conflict was sparked by the offensive military manoeuvre in the region by pro-government troops. Al Jazeera notes that on 25 April, the STC declared self-rule in the port city of Aden and nearby areas. Yemen’s Foreign Minister has urged the STC to implement a power-sharing...

30% of prisoners have coronavirus – Villavicencio, Colombia

In the city of Villavicencio, over 700 inmates and guards, 30% of the prison population, were reported to have contracted the coronavirus. In April the Colombian government announced that they would release 4,000 low-risk inmates under house arrest to help curb the spread of the virus however three weeks later only 320 were released. According to Nelson Barrera, a representative of the prison’s staff, little can be done due to limited space and overcrowding. This has made it “impossible to establish isolation zones required by the Secretary of Health”. The unsanitary conditions and...

Skirmish on Indian-Chinese Border

There was a brief skirmish between Indian and Chinese forces in Sikkim, a northeastern Indian state bordering China. The conflict was able to reach resolution with only minor injuries to soldiers as both sides engaged in dialogue. 4 Indian soldiers were said to be injured and 7 Chinese soldiers during the conflict which involved around 150 soldiers. Both sides have accused each other of intruding on their territory but the major conflict has not arisen since the 1962 war. Read more from Reuters.

UK Labour party clarifies position on Kashmir

Responding to an enquiry from the Muslim Council of Britain over statements made on Kashmir, Labour leader, Keir Starmer, issued a statement clarifying that a lasting settlement may only be reached “with the people of Kashmir”. Starmer, who has taken over as Labour leader, following the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, had previously statement maintaining that it “bilateral issue for India and Pakistan”. He further stated that such “issues of the subcontinent” should not “divide communities here” and that they were “constitutional issues in India and a matter for the Indian parliament”. The...

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