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The role of the Libyan Diaspora

The Libyan Diaspora has a significant role to play in this uprising. Though undeniably important, it is not enough for Libyans to protest outside embassies overseas. Due to Qaddafi’s shut down of the Internet, the Diaspora has become more important, particularly in spreading information about gatherings … and pressuring the international community to support the well-deserved and long overdue freedom for the Libyan people.”

- Ibrahim Sharqieh, Deputy Director of The Brookings Institution’s Doha Center. See his comment here.

“We are also listening to the voices of the Libyan diaspora, including the voices of Libyan Canadians, who are saying enough is enough.”

Bob Rae, Liberal Party of Canada’s Foreign Affairs Critic. See the party’s statement here (See also 2009 reports on Rae and Sri Lanka here and here

“My body is here, but my heart and soul is in Libya. My life is at a standstill. I can’t work. I feel sad and angry and sometimes can’t even bear to watch the news.”

Soad El-Rgaig, a Libyan Diaspora member. See her comment for the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR) here.

Also, listen here to one Libyan diaspora journalist, Sarah Abdurrahman, describe how she, along with friends and family, have been trying to bring about change in Libya from laptops in Washington (source On The Media):

 

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