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LLRC report falls short - cross-party UK MPs

The LLRC report "falls short of addressing the evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity" said the British All Party Parliamentary Group for Tamils (APPG-T), adding, "it is important now that the international community holds Sri Lanka to their obligations under international law to allow for an international independent investigation".

Read the statement, released Thursday, here in full.

Extracts reproduced below.

"The Government of Sri Lanka has long deflected calls for an international independent investigation into allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity stating that the LLRC would fulfil its obligations under international humanitarian laws (IHL) to address accountability.

"Although the report appears to offer a more realistic view of the post-war situation and provide some positive recommendations to address the current human rights concerns in Sri Lanka, the LLRC’s conclusions on the prosecution of the conflict contradict many of the findings of the United Nations Panel of Experts report on Sri Lanka."

"However, as anticipated by many reputed human rights groups LLRC report falls short of addressing the evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity, committed during the final phases of the conflict, by the government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) and fails to advance accountability for the victims."

"Governments, including the UK, have said they will support the establishment of an international investigation unless the Sri Lankan government demonstrates progress on accountability."

"It is important now that the international community holds Sri Lanka to their obligations under international law to allow for an international independent investigation to ensure that the victims of war crimes and crimes against humanity get justice and the process of reconciliation can pave the way for lasting peace on the island."

"The All Party Parliamentary Group for Tamils now expects nothing but a robust engagement with the Sri Lankan State from here on to address issues of accountability."

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